Assuming that the territory of the Kingdom of Uganda, located within the borders provided for in the agreement, amounts to 19,600 square miles, it is divided into the following parts: the agreement provides that the Kabaka should exercise direct domination over the indigenous people of Buganda, who are right through the Lukiiko and its officials. [6] He also consolidated the power of the head of Bakungu`s largely Protestant clientele, led by Kagwa. The British sent few officials to run the country, relying mainly on Bakungu chiefs. For decades, they were privileged because of their political skill, Christianity, friendly relations with the British, ability to collect taxes, and Entebbe`s proximity to the Ugandan capital. In the 1920s, British administrators were more confident and had less need for military or administrative support. [4] On Tuesday, March 10, exactly 120 years will have passed since the kingdom of Buganda under Kabaka (king) Daudi Chwa jumped into bed with the British. Not only did the signing of the agreement take away the Kingdom`s rights, but it also paved the way for sponsorship and looting of other parts of Uganda. The agreement consolidated British rule in Buganda and also gave the Baganda the opportunity to extend their influence to other parts of the country. Territories that were not under the kingdoms were taken over by the Neocolonians of Buganda like Semei Kakungulu. The Uganda Agreement (the Treaty of Mengo) of March 1900 formalized relations between the Kingdom of Uganda and the protectorate of British Uganda. [1] It was amended by the Buganda Agreement of 1955 and the Buganda Agreement of 1961. In 1935, Sir Philip Mitchell arrived in Uganda as governor after serving sixteen years earlier in Tanganjika.

He was convinced that the relationship between Uganda and the Protecting Power should be different from that between the local authorities and the Government of Tanganjika. [9] Recognizing that the early protectorate agents had produced a pattern of growing distrust and clandestine change, Mitchell devised a plan for reform and transformation of the system between the protectorate government and the Buganda government. [10] Believing that the relationship between the protectorate government and the Buganda indigenous government was one of protected rather than indirect domination, he planned to replace the post of Buganda provincial commissioner with one resident and remove district officials from the centre, assuming that the Kabaka would be required to follow the advice of the resident and his staff. [9] However, under the 1900 Uganda Agreement, the Kabaka was only required to respond to these recommendations if the Lukiiko resolutions were implemented. Relations between the Kabaka, the Protectorate government and its ministers deteriorated, and due to the limited power of the governor under the 1900 agreement to impose his advice on Kabaka, the reorganization led to a steady decrease in the influence that the protectorate government could exert in Buganda. [9] Mailo`s land was divided into members of the royal family, officials of the kingdom, and a few individuals. The other beneficiaries were religious institutions. When the agreement was signed, it was estimated that the figures for the areas allocated were estimated.

After the interrogation, the parties had to meet and conclude what the agreement had decided after the award. This culminated in 1913 with the attribution of Buganda Agreement.As the wake of Article 15, the natives who did not fall into the categories of people to whom the land was assigned were rendered landless. . . .